What to Eat in Gujarat

1 . Bajri Na Rotla

Mix salt and Bajri flour. Now add a little water at a time and kneed into firm dough. Add water as needed. The dough should be soft enough. Now wet your palm and place a medium size ball of dough in between your palms. Gently press and flatten the ball. Keep flattening it as if you are clapping your hands gently. You will have to keep your palms wet so that the dough doesn t stick to your palms. Keep on expanding rotla this way until you get it of your desired thickness.Place it slowly on hot clay tawa(also called Tavdi). Take care that there should not be any air between, tavdi and rotla .Cook on low flame for about a minute and then gently flip it over to cook the other side. Turn the heat to medium high while cooking the other side for another minute. Now turn again and cook the other side until fully cooked. take it off from tavdi and spread Ghee on it. Serve Hot with Ringan no olo.

2 . Maize

known in some English-speaking countries as corn, is a large grain plant domesticated by indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica in prehistoric times. The leafy stalk produces ears which contain the grain, which are seeds called kernels. Maize kernels are often used in cooking as a starch.

3 . Bhakri

Bhakri is a round flat unleavened bread often used in the cuisine of the state of Maharashtra in India but is also common in western and central India, especially in the states of Rajasthan, Gujarat, Malwa, Goa, and northern Karnataka. It is coarser than a roti. It can be either soft or hard in texture, compared to a British biscuit with respect to hardness.Being a staple bread, bhakri is served with curd, chutney, vegetables, and rice. It is made mostly from wheat flour, jowar flour, bajra flour, nachni (or finger millet) flour, and even rice flour (in the Konkan region). Bhakris are made primarily with hot water, and flour. It has traditionally been the farmer s food which would be carried to the farm at the crack of dawn and make up for both breakfast and lunch.

4 . Paratha

A paratha/parantha/parauntha is a flatbread that originated in the Indian Subcontinent. It is still quite prevalent throughout the area. Parantha is an amalgamation of the words parat and atta which literally means layers of cooked dough. In Burma, it is known as palata while it is known as farata in Mauritius and the Maldives. However, in areas of the Punjabi region, it is referred to as prontha or parontay.It is one of the most popular unleavened flat breads in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent and is made by pan frying whole wheat dough on a tava. The parantha dough usually contains ghee or cooking oil which is also layered on the freshly prepared paratha. Paranthas are usually stuffed with boiled potatoes (as in aloo ka parantha), leaf vegetables, radishes, cauliflower, and/or paneer (Cottage-cheese). A parantha (especially a stuffed one) can be eaten simply with a pat of butter spread on top, with chutney, pickles, and yogurt, or with meat or vegetable curries. Some roll the parantha into a tube and eat it with tea, often dipping the parantha.

5 . Whole wheat flour

Whole-wheat flour is a powdery substance, a basic food ingredient, derived by grinding or mashing the whole grain of wheat, also known as the wheatberry. Whole-wheat flour is used in baking of breads and other baked goods, and also typically mixed with other lighter white unbleached or bleached flours (that have been treated with flour bleaching agent(s)) to restore nutrients to the white flours (especially fiber, protein, and vitamins), texture, and body that are lost in milling and other processing to the finished baked goods or other food(s).

6 . Puran Poli

is a traditional type of sweet flatbread made in India in the states of Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Gujarat Tamil Nadu and Goa.

7 . Maharashtrian Puran Poli

Puran poli is a classical Marathi dish, which is a dessert served during auspicious occasions and during important festivals such as Holi, Padwa in Maharashtra. Although it resembles like a roti, a poli is actually very different. It is made mostly during holi when the bonfire is lit. The stuffing is known as puran and the outer cover is known as poli. The puran is made by boiling chickpea lentils with a pinch of turmeric for color. When the lentils are cooked and soft, the broth is removed and kept aside.Jaggery is added to the chickpeas and cooked till they are soft. Then the stuffing is removed and sieved through a utensil made specifically for puran to achieve a smoother consistency. Saffron, cardamom, and nutmeg is added for additional flavor. The outer cover is made by making a dough by mixing refined flour, milk and ghee. Equal number of balls are made of the dough as well as the stuffing. The puran is stuffed inside the dough and then rolled out flat using a rolling pin. The poli is then cooked on a hot griddle and served with ghee and a soup made from the syurp.The stuffing is cooled to room temperature. Meanwhile, the outer dough is prepared. A very soft, rubbery dough is prepared by kneading polished wheat-flour with a little water and a large amount of oil. This is left soaked in oil for a few hours.

8 . Puri

Is an unleavened deep-fried Indian bread, commonly consumed on the Indian subcontinent. It is eaten for breakfast or as a snack or light meal. It is usually served with a curry or bhaji, as in Puri bhaji.Puri is most commonly served at breakfast. It is also served at special or ceremonial functions as part of ceremonial rituals along with other vegetarian food offered in prayer as prasadam.

9 . Dhebra

Dhebra is a Gujarati food item made of pearl millet flour.To create dhebra, sufficient water and salt is mixed in millet flour to make a dough. The resulting dough balls are then flattened on a chakla to a round shape using a belan (rolling pin). Then, both sides of the dhebra are streamed with vegetable oil on a tava, until small brown spots appear.This is a plain dhebra, made of millet flour (bajra atta). Because it is the simplest dhebra to make, it is the most commonly consumed in India. Another variety is the methi dhebra, in which methi (fenugreek) is added as flavour.

10 . Pooda

Hope you are having a blessed day and wish you a fantastic year ahead! This week s recipe is for Fenugreek Pancakes, Gujarati style.In Gujarat, they are also known as Methi ni Bhaaji na Pooda and they taste absolutely delicious! Methi ni bhaaji means fenugreek and pooda means pancakes. I remember eating them for as long as I have been around from my childhood days in Zambia all the way right up to the present day and they have never failed to disappoint.

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