Chinese Embroidery Tips

Chinese Embroidery Tips

1 . Chinese embroidery

Chinese embroidery refers to embroidery created by any of the cultures located in the area that makes up modern China. It is some of the oldest extant needlework. The four major regional styles of Chinese embroidery are suzhou embroidery (su Xiu), Hunan embroidery (Xiang Xiu), Guangdong embroidery (Yue Xiu) and sichuan embroidery (shu Xiu). All of them are nominated as Chinese Intangible Cultural Heritage.

2 . Assisi embroidery

Assisi embroidery is a form of counted thread embroidery based on an ancient Italian needlework tradition in which the background is filled with embroidery stitches and the main motifs are outlined but not stitched. The name is derived from the Italian town of Assisi where the modern form of the craft originated.

3 . Bargello

Bargello is a type of needlepoint embroidery consisting of upright flat stitches laid in a mathematical pattern to create motifs. The name originates from a series of chairs found in the Bargello palace in Florence, which have a flame stitch pattern.Traditionally, Bargello was stitched in wool on canvas.Embroidery done this way is remarkably durable. It is well suited for use on pillows, upholstery and even carpets, but not for clothing. In most traditional pieces, all stitches are vertical with stitches going over two or more threads.

4 . Berlin wool work

Berlin wool work is a style of embroidery similar to today needlepoint. It was typically executed with wool yarn on canvas. It is usually worked in a single stitch, such as cross stitch or tent stitch although Beeton book of Needlework (1870) describes 15 different stitches for use in Berlin work. It was traditionally stitched in many colours and hues, producing intricate three dimensional looks by careful shading. The design of such embroidery was made possible by the great progresses made in dyeing in the 1830s, especially by the discovery of aniline dyes which produced bright colors.This kind of work created very durable and long lived pieces of embroidery that could be used as furniture covers, cushions, bags, or even on clothing.

5 . Blackwork

Blackwork, sometimes historically termed spanish blackwork, is a form of embroidery generally using black thread, although other colors were also used on occasion. sometimes it is counted thread embroidery which is usually stitched on even weave fabric. Any black thread can be used, but firmly twisted threads give a better look than embroidery floss. Traditionally blackwork is stitched in silk thread on white or off white linen or cotton fabric. sometimes metallic threads or coloured threads are used for accents.scarletwork is like blackwork, except it is sewn with red thread.

6 . Broderie anglaise

Broderie anglaise (French, English embroidery ) is a whitework needlework technique incorporating features of embroidery, cutwork and needle lace that became associated with England, due to its popularity there in the 19th century.

7 . Broderie perse

Broderie perse (French for Persian embroidery ) is a style of applique embroidery which uses printed elements to create a scene on the background fabric. It was most popular in Europe in the 17th century, and probably travelled from India, as there are some earlier findings there. The technique could be considered an early form of puzzle piecing.Broderie perse can be done with any printed fabric on any ground, but it originally was worked with Chintz type fabrics. Chintz typically has clearly defined, separated motifs, which were cut out and invisibly applied onto the ground fabric. The typical intention was to create a scene from the motifs, but the decoration could also be random. The resulting fabric was often made into bedspreads, either unlined for summer or quilted for winter. They were typically saved for special occasions, such as guest beds.

8 . Candlewicking

Candlewicking, or Candlewick is a form of whitework embroidery that traditionally uses an unbleached cotton thread on a piece of unbleached muslin. It gets its name from the nature of the soft spun cotton thread, which was braided then used to form the wick for candles. Motifs are created using a variety of traditional embroidery stitches as well as a tufted stitch. subject matter is usually taken from nature flowers, insects, pine trees, and so on, Other traditional motifs resemble Pennsylvania Dutch or Colonial American designs. Modern designs include colored floss embroidery with the traditional white on white stitching.Loom woven or machine made candlewicks of the early 19th century are white bedcovers with designs created during the weaving process by raising loops over a small twig or tool.

9 . Canvas work

Canvas work is a type of embroidery in which yarn is stitched through a canvas or other foundation fabric. Canvas work is a form of counted thread embroidery. Common types of canvas work include needlepoint, petit point, and bargello.

10 . Celtic cross stitch

Celtic cross stitch is a style of cross stitch embroidery which recreates Celtic art patterns typical of early medieval Insular art using contemporary cross stitch techniques. Celtic cross stitch typically employs rich, deep colors, intricate geometrical patterns, spirals, interlacing patterns, knotwork, alphabets, animal forms and zoomorphic patterns, similar to the decorations found in the Book of Kells.Although they share design inspirations, today Celtic cross stitch differs from the embroidery of the Celtic Revival of the late 19th and early 20th century which employed freehand surface embroidery stitches in line with the principles of the Arts and Crafts Movement (see art needlework).Celtic cross stitch embroideries are very much part of the heritage found in scotland, Isle of Man and Ireland. These cross stitch patterns are used to decorate everyday items, such as cushion covers, wall tapestries and decorations, tea cozies, eyeglass covers and clothing.

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