Myth about Adoption

Myth about Adoption

1 . If I adopt internationally

All children are curious about where they came from For those who do not have facts, you will explore possible scenarios with your child You will also discuss why adoptions from that country occurred at that time As for the fears of contact with birth families, the reality is that contact can be anything from a phone conversation somewhere along the adoption process, to ongoing contact during and after the adoption takes place Having contact does not mean you are co parenting It means that everyone cares about the child s best interests Years ago, the possibility of contact with birth parents in international adoption was improbable But now with the Internet and international search groups, it has become easier for birth parents and siblings to find one another and gain information about family history

2 . Adoption is very expensive

The costs of adoption vary depending on the type of process and allowable state and federal expenses Costs may include legal or agency fees, the baby and birth mother s medical costs, the birth family s living expenses, travel expenses, advertising and networking fees, federal application fees, homestudy and post adoption report fees Some families choose a process or to remain close to home to reduce travel costs You should always get a detailed written explanation of the costs of a particular adoption before you agree to proceed Rough estimates of what you may spend You can offset the costs of adoption by taking advantage of state and federal tax credits, adoption subsidies and reimbursements for children with special needs, adoption loans and grants,employer benefits

3 . I can get all the information I need on the Internet

There is a lot of information on the Internet, the adoption process needs to be tailored to your particular family Remember, it is hard to know who is posting information in cyberspace Adoption professionals recommend you double check any information with a local source In addition to finding out the most current information, you also need to make sure you meet state and federal regulations regarding adoption There are many sites and e lists established for families built through a particular type of adoption Many of these sites provide tremendous support, parenting advice, and resources Weigh carefully what you are reading, your need for human contact and support based on your family s needs, and consult with local professionals when unclear of your next steps

4 . Only married couples with a stay at home parent can adopt children from foster care

A person s marital status, age, income, or sexual orientation do not automatically disqualify them from eligibility to adopt You don t need to own your own home, have children already, be young, wealthy, or a stay at home parent In 2011, 32 percent of children adopted from foster care were matched with either a single parent household or unmarried couple This includes adoptions by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families Find out more about who can foster and adopt

5 . Each child has to have a room of their own

Each child needs a bed of their own, not a room of their own In addition, children of the opposite fun may share a room if they are under an age specified by the State (usually around 6 years old) In some instances, however, there may be child to square feet requirements or behavioral concerns that will prevent children from being able to share a room Find out more about being an adoptive parent and being a foster parent

6 . Sibling relationships don t matter

Placing siblings together is almost always the best thing for them after being separated from their birth parents It helps provide continuity and protects them from suffering additional loss Currently 25 percent of children photolisted on AdoptUSKids are siblings who need to be placed together

7 . The Hope of Being Adopted

You don t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent There are thousands of children in foster care who would be happy to be part of your family To a foster care child, waiting to be adopted can feel like waiting for a miracle You could be that miracle Watch the video the right to hear from children in their own words talk about the hope of being adopted

8 . A birth parent or another relative
can take an adopted child back

Adoptions of children from U S foster care are legally binding agreements that do not occur until the rights of all parents have been legally terminated by a court of law It s very rare that an adoption is challenged in court by a child s birth relative More than 98 percent of legally completed adoptions remain intact Find out more about legalizing an adoption As far as child in foster care having continued contact with their birth family, it will vary depending on the specifics of the case and the placement being considered for the child

9 . Can I continue with any fertility treatments whilst I apply to adopt

If you have been undergoing treatment to conceive, we will usually ask that at least six months have elapsed since the last cycle of treatment has finished This request will depend on how long you were in treatment and may vary case by case We know from experience and research that this period after treatment allows for the one chapter to end and another begin It is best that adoption is a positive choice rather than a reactive one to infertility

10 . Do I need experience of looking after children

if you want to adopt, particularly if you are thinking of older children or sibling groups Some of our applicants undertake voluntary work in a nursery, school or club to gain experience with children they do not know, as this can be helpful
Clearly any personal or professional