Weird Stories

Weird Stories

1 . Car lands on roof

In a scene you would expect in an action movie (or a comedy), a stolen car landed on the roof of a house in Fresno, Calif. Police say the car was going too fast and hit a rock and a tree stump, which launched it into the air and onto the roof. The driver of the car fled the scene and was arrested soon after at his girlfriends home. There were people in the house when the car landed on it, but no one was seriously injured. A towing company had to use a crane to remove the vehicle.

2 . Stolen cash returned to bank robber

Bank manager Otto Neuman embezzled ?150,000 in cash and gold from the Erste Bank in Vienna in 1993. He covered up the theft by having accomplices stage a robbery. Of the total, only ?51,000 and some gold was recovered when police arrested Neuman. The gold went to the insurer, and the cash was kept as evidence for 19 years. Now, the Austrian Justice Ministry is returning the money to Neuman! The insurer compensated the bank for its loss, the gold had appreciated so much in the intervening years that the insurer suffered no loss in the long run, and the ministry feels it has no claim on the cash.

3 . The fork in the road is taken

The headlines just write themselves. A six-foot-tall fork appeared in Carlsbad, Calif., in the traffic island at the intersection of Levante Street and Anillo Way on Oct. 16. The unnamed artist is a 62-year-old retired teacher who said he was impressed by the joke in The Muppet Movie in which the characters encounter a giant silverware fork when they are looking for a fork in the road. Carlsbad residents got a kick out of the sculpture, but a city crew removed it the next day. Another resident erected a sign in its place that says Why the fork not? which the city also removed. Then residents then began taping real, normal-sized forks to a nearby sign. A spokesperson for the city said the sculpture is a code violation.

4 . How do you re home homing pigeons

Roy Day of Northfleet, Kent, England, had 20 homing pigeons in his garden shed. Neighbors complained of the noise and smell, and the Gravesham Borough Council notified Day that the pigeons were a health problem and that he would have to sell or give his pigeons away. Day says that if he took the pigeons somewhere else, they would come back, because that is what homing pigeons do. They gave me a seven-day deadline to get rid of them, but even if they went 150-odd miles away, theyd still come back they are homing pigeons.

5 . Blue honey traced to M and Ms

Beekeepers in northeastern France were puzzled to find their hives were full of honey in strange blue and green tints. Although flowers bloom in colors, the nectar from them is usually colorless. The culprit turned out to be candy-coated M&Ms! A biogas plant near Ribeauville in Alsace had contracted with a Mars candy manufacturer to process the plants waste products, which included the colored candy and food dye. The biogas company was red-faced when confronted with blue honey, and promised to rectify the situation by immediately covering the waste to prevent bees from eating it, and to process the materials as soon as possible. The blue and green honey will not be sold.

6 . Scottish village gets a sister city on Mars

Many cities and towns around the world have a link to another city or town far away, for friendship and cultural exchanges. The village of Glenelg, on the western coast of Scotland, has announced it will twin with another place with the same name. Glenelg, Mars, is the designated name of the spot that the Mars Curiosity rover is headed toward. Officials in Glenelg, the Scottish one, held an official twinning ceremony on Oct. 20. It was a smashing success, and pictures are posted at the Glenelg and Arnisdale Community Portal. Although there were no Martian natives at the ceremony, American astronaut Bonnie Dunbar did attend.

7 . Why the tortoise wouldnt eat

People ask why England has so many funny news stories. The reason is that American journalists typically skip these kinds of stories in favor of something more earth-shattering. Bless the U.K. for publishing them. Margaret Parker of Carlisle, England, found a five-inch-long tortoise in her garden. The miniature tortoise was cute, so she brought it inside and tried to feed it. Parkers daughter brought some lettuce for it, but it still wouldnt eat. So the women called Knoxwood Wildlife Rescue Centre for advice, and a volunteer was sent out. Pauline Adams picked up the tortoise and figured out the problem.

8 . German civil servant did nothing for 14 years

An unnamed German man retired at age 65 when his civil service position was eliminated. In an email letter addressed to his colleagues in the city of Menden, he boasted that he had done no actual work since 1998. However, in that time he had gone to his office and collected 745,000 euros ($980,000) in pay from the municipal state surveyors office. He blamed the waste on authorities who hired another surveyor to do the same job, leaving him with nothing to do. The man had been in the same job since 1974. Mayor Volker Fleige was upset when he received the email, and said the employee had never once complained before now.

9 . Wanted man turns himself in for reward

Taliban commander Mohammad Ashan saw his face on a wanted poster and noted the reward was $100. So he grabbed one of the fliers and went to a police checkpoint in the district of Sar Howza, Afghanistan, where he demanded the reward. Afghan officials arrested him instead. He was wanted for plotting attacks on Afghan security forces.

10 . Dead snake bites man

A 41-year-old homeless man in Mobile, Ala., was treated with anti-venom after he was bitten by a decapitated cottonmouth. A friend had seen the snake in a creek and cut its head off with a machete. The unnamed victim was playing with the severed head and stuck his finger in the snakes mouth. By reflex, the snake head bit down on the finger. The man first refused medical treatment, but after he started showing symptoms of venom poisoning, he was taken to USA Medical Center, treated, and released.