What to Eat in Arunachal Pradesh

What to Eat in Arunachal Pradesh

1 . Gulab Jamun

These are small balls which are prepared from Mava and then wrapped in wheat flour to be fried in pure ghee. Once the balls turn golden brown, they are ready to be dropped in sugar syrup for added taste.

2 . Bhajji

Bhajji or bhaji is a spicy Indian snack similar to pakora or potato fritters, with several variants. It is usually used as a topping on various Indian meals but has become popular to eat alone as a nack.[citation needed] It is a popular street food in Maharashtra, India and can be found for sale in streetside stalls, especially in dhabas on highways.Apart from being a must in the traditional Maharashtrian Hindu meal on festivals and the like, bhajjis top the comfort food list when it comes to monsoons and rains. They are generally served with a piping hot cup of coffee, tea or a traditional serving of Yameen.

3 . Green bean

Green beans, also known as string bean, snap bean in the northeastern and western United States, or ejotes in Mexico, are the unripe fruit of various cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Green bean cultivars have been selected especially for the fleshiness, flavor, or sweetness of their pods.

4 . Buttermilk

Buttermilk refers to a number of dairy drinks. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cream. This type of buttermilk is known as traditional buttermilk.The term buttermilk also refers to a range of fermented milk drinks, common in warm climates (e.g., the Balkans, the Middle East, Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka and the Southern United States) where unrefrigerated fresh milk sours quickly, as well as in colder climates, such as Scandinavia, Finland, Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Slovakia and Czech Republic. This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cows milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria

5 . Dal

Dal or pappu or paripu is a dried pulse (lentil, pea or various types of bean) which has been split. The outer hull is usually stripped off; dal that has not been hulled is described as chilka (skin), e.g. chilka urad dal, mung dal chilka. The word dal is also used to name the thick stew prepared from these pulses, an important part of Indian, Nepali, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, West Indian and Bangladeshi cuisine. It is regularly eaten with rice in southern India, and with both rice and roti (wheatbased flat bread) throughout northern India and Pakistan as well as Bangladesh, East India, and Nepal where Dal Baht (literally: dal and rice) is the staple food for much of the population. Dal is a ready source of proteins for a balanced diet containing little or no meat. Sri Lankan cooking of dal resembles that of southern Indian dishes.

6 . Papadum

Papadam, pronounced as poppadum is a thin, crisp discshaped Indian food typically based on a seasoned dough made from black gram (urad flour), fried or cooked with dry heat. Flours made from other sources such as lentils, chickpeas, rice, or potato, can be used. Papadams are typically served as an accompaniment to a meal in India, or as an appetizer or snack, sometimes with toppings such as chopped onions, chopped carrots, chutneys or other dips and condiments. In certain parts of India, papadums which have been dried but not precooked are used in curries and vegetable dishes.

7 . Mango pickle

Mango pickle refers to a variety of pickles prepared using mango. This is a very popular pickle in South Asia and India. These sometimes spicy pickles are also available commercially.

8 . lemon pickle

Preserved lemon or lemon pickle is a condiment that is common in Indian and North African cuisine. It is also known as country lemon and leems. Diced, quartered, halved, or whole, lemons are pickled in a brine of water, lemon juice, and salt; occasionally spices are included as well. The pickle is allowed to ferment at room temperature for weeks or months before it is used. The pulp of the preserved lemon can be used in stews and sauces, but it is the peel (zest and pith together) that is most valued. The flavor is mildly tart but intensely lemony.

9 . Achaar

Achaar, also known as South Asian pickles or Indian pickles, are made from certain individual varieties of vegetables and fruits that are chopped into small pieces and cooked in edible oils like sesame oil or brine with many different Indian spices like asafoetida, red chili powder, turmeric, fenugreek, and plenty of salt. Some regions also specialize in pickling meats and fish. Vegetables can also be combined in pickles to make mixed vegetable pickle. Some varieties of fruits and vegetables are small enough to be used whole.

10 . Thecha

Thecha is vegetarian Maharashtrian food preparation. It is prepared crushing together green or red chilies, salt and garlic, oil/ghee and cloves may be added. It is served with dishes like pithla bhakri. or is eaten with bhakri. A regional variation is the varhadi thecha. It has been described by Sanjeev Kapoor as a popular relish.