What to Eat in Uttar Pradesh

What to Eat in Uttar Pradesh

1 . Kadhi Bari

these fried soft dumplings made of besan (gram flour) are cooked in a spicy gravy of yogurt and besan. It goes well over plain rice. India has a variety of kadhis, from different parts of the country. The Bihari kadhi is a one that uses badi (pakoda) dumplings. It is considered inauspicious in Bihar to prepare plain kadhi without any dumplings.For the badi, you need: a cup of gram flour (besan), chopped green chillies, asafoetida (hing), baking powder, oil for frying, and salt.For the kadhi, you need: two tablespoons of besan, a cup of thick curd, a couple of red chillies, black mustard seeds, curry leaves, asafoetida, half a teaspoon of chopped ginger (optional), a tablespoon of oil and salt.

2 . Shami kebab

hami kebab or Shaami kebab is a popular local variety of kebab especially in Punjab. It is a part of Indian and Pakistani cuisine. A variation of the Shaami kebab is also found in Bangladeshi cuisine. It is composed of a small patty of minced meat, (usually beef or mutton in India, but occasionally lamb or mutton), with ground chickpeas, egg to hold it together, and spices.Shami kebabs are a popular snack throughout India and Pakistan. They are often garnished with lemon juice and/or sliced raw onions, and may be eaten with chutney made from mint or coriander. They are also served along with Sheer Khurma during Eid celebrations.

3 . Pasanda

Pasand is a popular North Indian and Pakistani meat dish, derived from a meal served in the Court of the Moghul Emperors. The word is a variation on the Urdu word pasande meaning favourite, which refers to the prime cut of meat traditionally used within.

4 . Kebab

Kebab (also kebap or kabab) is a Middle Eastern dish of pieces of meat, fish, or vegetables roasted or grilled on a skewer or spit originating in the Middle East, and later adopted in Central Asia and by the regions of the former Mongol Empire and later Ottoman Empire, before spreading worldwide. In American English, kebab with no qualification refers to shish kebab cooked on a skewer, whereas in Europe it refers to doner kebab, sliced meat served in a pita. In the Middle East, however, kebab refers to meat that is cooked over or next to flames; large or small cuts of meat, or even ground meat; it may be served on plates, in sandwiches, or in bowls. The traditional meat for kebab is lamb, but depending on local tastes and religious prohibitions, other meats may include beef, goat, chicken, pork or fish. Like other ethnic foods brought by travellers, the kebab has remained a part of everyday cuisine in most of the Eastern Mediterranean and South Asia. It is also popular among Western youth as a snack after a night-out.

5 . Nihari

Nihari is a South Asian stew consisting of slow cooked beef or lamb garnished to taste and served with cooked brains or bone marrow.

6 . Baati chokha of BALIA

Baatiis a hard, unleavened bread cooked in the desert areas of Rajasthan, and in Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. Its prized for its long shelf life and high nutritional content, and in desert areas, for the minimal quantity of water required for its preparation. Baati is always eaten with dal. Baati is also closely related to Litti (cuisine) popular in Eastern UP and Western Bihar. Litti can be enjoyed with Chokha (a spice seasoned mash of potato, tomato and roasted aubergine).Baati can either be plain or have various kinds of fillings, including onions, peas, and sattu. Bafla is a kind of baati, which is softer. Bafla and baati are always eaten with hot dal with pure ghee and chutney.

7 . Methi Paratha

methi paratha is a quick breakfast or a side accompaniment to any curry or sabzi. methi parathas are healthy alternative to plain parathas and packed with more flavors and nutrition.these fenugreek flat breads can just be had plain with indian chai too. they are so good. they also make a good tiffin box snack and stay soft if packed in a foil. fenugreek aka methi leaves is easily found in india and i often end up making lots of dishes from it. they can also be grown easily in your balcony or herb garden if you have one.when living in bangalore, we would grow methi and there was never a shortage of methi for us. i would even add the tender sauted leaves to salads and make a variety of dishes from it.

8 . Chole Bhature

chole bhature is one of the most popular punjabi recipe which is now liked almost all over india and even abroad. chole stands for a spicy curry made with white chickpeas and bhatura is fried leavened flat bread.chole bhature is a spicy, tasty and a heavy dish. i have eaten this dish at many places in punjab and delhi. each restaurants or dhabas have their own flavors and taste in the chole. in some places it is very spicy, at other places it has tangy taste and the consistency of the curry also varies from slightly thick to semi-dry and dry.this recipe of chole has spicy flavors. this is my mom

9 . Daal Makhani

Dal makhani or maa di dal, as it is popularly known in the punjab, with its smooth velvety texture and lovely flavour is a delicacy that is very much a dish of the punjab. Every punjabi restaurant, roadside eating place and food stall vendor makes the claim that this is a delicacy that they alone can make to perfection. This my own tested recipe dare i claim it as the best? dal makhani is traditionally cooked on a low flame overnight and allowed to thicken. Using a pressure cooker helps cook the dal in a jiffy. Serve hot with naans.

10 . Kofta

Kofta (see section Name for other names) is an Iranian, Middle Eastern, Indian and Balkan meatball or meatloaf. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat usually beef or lamb mixed with spices and/or onions. In India, Turkey and Iran, koftas are usually made of lamb, beef, mutton or chicken, whereas Greek and Cypriot varieties are usually made of beef, veal, pork or mixtures of them. They are often shaped into meatballs which are prepared with a mixture of ground meat, rice and leeks, and served dry. In India, vegetarian varieties, like lauki kofta and shahi aloo kofta, are popular, as religious beliefs generally forbid consumption of meat. In Iran, Balochistan and Pakistan, koftas are served with a spiced gravy, as dry versions are considered to be kebabs. Shrimp and fish koftas are found in South India, West Bengal, Bangladesh and in some parts of the Persian Gulf states.